• Lydia Kiros

Let’s Talk Black Wellness

Many of us, if not all, can testify that 2020 has been a very long year. It feels as though we are perpetually stuck in March and can’t get out. Calling it a whirlwind of a year doesn’t even scratch the surface of the turmoil we’ve been facing. This year is unique in the fact that we have been sharing in collective hardship together. COVID-19, this invisible virus, has rocked our world throwing us into a pandemic like we have never experienced. The Black Lives Matter movement (though not new to this year) has taken on a momentum like never before spilling out beyond just America. As Black people, we’ve witnessed one too many murders and violence against black bodies at the hands of police. Not to mention we lost a global icon and hero to many at the start of this year, Kobe Bryant. This list goes on and on. If you’re anything like me, you’ve probably had your own share of personal struggles and/or grief to navigate throughout all of this.

In the midst of all of this chaos, it’s important to pause, reset, and recharge. Now, perhaps more than ever we are constantly consuming information. In quarantine, information overload is on 1000. Whether it’s via social media, news, or even conversations with friends, we are almost always absorbing information. Your timeline is probably filled with videos of racism perpetuated against black people, another petition to sign, another tweet from the President, how to vote in the Presidential election, etc. While all the content you consume may not be negative, it can definitely be exhausting.

Let’s talk self-care. We’re familiar with the term, we’ve seen it championed across social media. Self-care can look like a beach day, unplugging from electronics, reading, exercising, you fill in the blank. Anything that contributes to your physical, emotional, mental, and spiritual well being can classify as self-care. For us, as Black women and men, this world can feel as though it is sucking us dry. So let’s replenish. Here are some resources to contribute to your Black (Mental) Wellness on your next scroll though Instagram.

Therapy for Black Girls (@therapyforblackgirls)

Therapy for Black Girls is a platform on Instagram founded by Dr. Joy Harden Bradford that offers mental health resources for Black girls. The page provides a resource to find a therapist and has a podcast that produces weekly content on all things mental health and personal development. If you’re ready to get started with therapy, their website provides a guide to help you with the first steps. Therapy for Black Girls also has a focus on de-stigmatizing mental health and making mental health topics more relevant and accessible for Black women and girls.


Men Thrive (@men_thrive)

Men Thrive is a “disruptive digital platform + community that provides resources and tools for Black Men to thrive mentally”. Their page highlights Black men and offers tips and encouragement to improve mental health and break stigmas. They host a podcast, guided meditations, and an opportunity to join their tribe. Men Thrive rejects the myth that “Black men have to be emotionless to be strong; wear a mask, hiding the most beautiful aspects of their brilliance; go alone to make it; all while grinding to survive.”


Brown Girl Therapy (@browngirltherapy)

Brown Girl Therapy is the first and largest mental health community for children of immigrants created by Sahaj Kaur Kohili (@sahajkohli). For my fellow Black diaspora, this is the resource you didn’t know you needed. This page promotes therapy and bicultural identity uniquely for those with an immigrant or first-generation background. The page highlights common mental health struggles for children of immigrants, benefits of going to therapy, and anti-racism as a form of mental health care.


Black Women Heal (@blackwomenheal_)

Black Women Heal was born out of a desire to address the trauma and issues that have come from COVID-19 and the protest over police brutality against Black bodies. Their mission is to highlight, embrace, and encourage Black women to work on healing the trauma caused by societal issues. The page serves as a virtual space curated for Black women by Black women and features “Candid Convos” on IG Live with various guests as well as Black wellness brands.


Therapy for Black Men (@therapyforblkmen)

Therapy for Black Men is dedicated to changing the narrative around Black Men in seeking support. Their website offers an extensive list of resources for Black men, ranging from finding a therapist, coach, and financial assistance for therapy. They also highlight stories, articles, and a blog dedicated to mental health. Some of their articles include “A Black King’s Guide to Self-Care” and “Hip-Hop, Barbershops, and Therapy: The Black Man’s Journey to Mental Health”.


Transparent Black Girl (@transparentblackgirl) / Transparent Black Guy (@transparentblackguy)

Transparent Black Girl and Transparent Black Guy are two wellness brands that fall under the wellness collective page Transparent & Black (@transparentandblack). Both pages provide space for Black women and men respectively where their healing is the priority. Transparent Black Girl posts in line with current events giving opportunities for discussion with #transparenttalk and curates wellness programming. Similarly, Transparent Black Guy also offers space for their community to check in through their posts. The page focuses on normalizing safe spaces for Black men, affirmations, and promotes positive images of Black men.



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